Jelena Filipović

Jelena Filipović

Dr Jelena Filipović is a professor of Spanish and Sociolinguistics at the Department of Iberian Studies, Faculty of Philology, University of Belgrade. She has been a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Purdue University, USA and at the University of Graz, Austria. Her research interests are in the areas of critical sociolinguistics, language policy and planning, gender studies, Sephardic studies, Hispanic and applied linguistics. She has authored and co-authored several books and several dozens of articles in academic journals and monographic publications. She has been engaged in a number of national and international projects in the areas of language education policies, gender sensitive language policies, foreign and second language teaching curriculum design and development and language maintenance and revitalization.

Love is... American romance novels, globalization, and cognitive schemes of the Serbian readership

Contemporary American romance has been present in Serbia for decades through mass translations sold on press stands and/or in book stores. And, defying some of the basic principles of translation theory, which insists on including context-bound knowledge, culturally situated social practices and cognition into the translation process and its outcomes, I herein postulate that American romance novels in Serbian translation actually erase cultural barriers and affirm specific cognitive schemes of their target female audiences (American and Serbian) which at first glance do not share any social or historical circumstances in which they live. Herein, a cognitive scheme of American romance novels is outlined (HEA: Happily ever after) from the perspective of the Serbian readership. Questions regarding directive force of cognitive cultural models supposedly implied by these schemes (i.e., the notion of a prince on a white horse who saves the helpless damsel from herself and the rest of the world) is discussed. It is postulated that a large portion of the readership (middle-aged women in particular) do not apply these schemes in the definition of their own cultural models, sending them into a parallel, escapist, utopian universe in which they would expect to be "rescued", "pampered" or "nourished" for ever by a strong, rich, brooding man completely dedicated to their well being. Rather, like some of use recur to yoga, Pilates or spa-centers, they use reading and books as temporary and occasional physical and emotional buffer zones which help them reconcile social, often extremely patriarchal, demands placed upon them on a daily basis and relax in literary spaces inhabited by positive romantic emotions and happy endings.